[]
[]

Outlander

Gabaldon, Diana (Book - 1992 )
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
Outlander
Print

Item Details

Claire Randall is leading a double life. She has a husband in one century, and a lover in another... In 1945, Claire Randall, a former combat nurse, is back from the war and reunited with her husband on a second honeymoon--when she innocently touches a boulder in one of the ancient stone circles that dot the British Isles. Suddenly she is a Sassenach--an "outlander"--in a Scotland torn by war and raiding border clans in the year of our Lord...1743. Hurled back in time by forces she cannot understand, Claire's destiny in soon inextricably intertwined with Clan MacKenzie and the forbidden Castle Leoch. She is catapulted without warning into the intrigues of lairds and spies that may threaten her life ...and shatter her heart. For here, James Fraser, a gallant young Scots warrior, shows her a passion so fierce and a love so absolute that Claire becomes a woman torn between fidelity and desire...and between two vastly different men in two irreconcilable lives.
Authors: Gabaldon, Diana
Title: Outlander
Publisher: New York : Dell, 1992, c1991.
Characteristics: 850 p. ;,18 cm.
Local Note: 6 7 8 17 80 97 110 133 150 152 210 231 242 274
ISBN: 0440212561
Statement of Responsibility: Diana Gabaldon
Subject Headings: Jacobite Rebellion, 1745-1746 Fiction. Culloden, Battle of, Scotland, 1746 Fiction. Scotland History 18th century Fiction. Time travel Fiction.
Genre/Form: Love stories-1992.
Fantasy fiction-1992.
Topical Term: Jacobite Rebellion, 1745-1746
Culloden, Battle of, Scotland, 1746
Time travel
MARC Display»

Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

Aug 05, 2014
  • carolecressman rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

After reading the newest in this wonderful series (Writ in my Own Heart's Blood), I just had to start re-reading. Is there a 5+ rating??? For anyone of Scots ancestry Claire and Jamie's saga is a must.

Aug 01, 2014
  • noble2 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

I read this is 6 days, I was glued to the pages! The author kept me guessing, I fell completely in love with Jamie the Scottish hottie, and told my fiancé I had a crush on a character in a book. Diana Gabaldon did a fanatic job writing a book that make in fall in love, weep, and ripped my heart out. I highly recommend.

Jul 28, 2014
  • PBnuffsaid rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

I half listened to this as an audio book and half read it. It's so long I had to consume it whenever I had a moment. The woman reading the audio book gets 5/5 stars, she was excellent with her reading and the accents and pace. I loved hearing her Scottish accent so much I noticed myself thinking in a Scottish accent and wondering what those might sound like out loud - then trying them out! (I'm a speech-language pathologist, listening to speech is my job!)

I loved this book. I had heard about this book quite a few times and was never interested because it talked of time travel. (I read The Time Traveler's Wife and wasn't impressed.) I would categorize this book more has historical fiction from a "modern" point of view. Also, there's a lot more, "romance" may not be the word, sex in this book than I expected. I don't normally read explicit romance type novels, but this one had just enough to be fun and entertaining, and yet enough other pieces of the story that this wasn't all about sex by any means.

I enjoy historical fiction, however, my fictional interests tend to be in late 1800s-early 1900s England and America. This book is neither of those, mostly set in the mid 1700s in Scotland and surrounding areas. I still loved it.

Outlander is an easy read and fairly easy to follow. There are a number of characters to keep track of, but they play big enough parts that they're not hard to recall. The book, while long, keeps the reader interested and entertained throughout.

I would recommend this to anyone who might like a historical fiction book, female protagonist narrator, a bit of sex and romance, and different adventures around every turn of the page. My only problem is that now I have 12? more books to read in the series! This could take a while!

May 21, 2014
  • ZenSojourner rated this: 0.5 stars out of 5.

This book is listed under Science Fiction/Fantasy, which it most definitely is not. It is a psuedo-historical bodice ripper. And I mean that LITERALLY, as the protagonist's bodice is literally ripped as soon as she trips into the 18th century where she is promptly sexually assaulted by various and sundry English and Scottish male contemporaries of varying levels of cleanliness. Furthermore, the women is so totally clueless that she can't figure out she's not in Kansas any more (OK, somewhere in post-WWII Scotland) DESPITE all these local yokels wandering about in historically accurate 17th century uniforms and clothing (not to mention speaking variations of 17th century English) until she sees the stars at night. So - multiple attempted rapes in the first few chapters of the book and a totally clueless heroine. Seriously - she doesn't attempt to cover her breasts after realizing her bodice is ripped because IT MIGHT ATTRACT MORE ATTENTION, even after she's been physically assaulted multiple times - what kind of idiot is that??? And she can't figure out that there's something wrong with the way she is dressed even after several men refer to her as a whore? In archaic English? And she still doesn't know she's in trouble? I'd give this 0 stars if I could. It's brainless, even for a bodice ripper. I am REALLY tired of coming across crap like this listed under SF/F - Having a few elements of SF/F does not an SF/F novel make. The main thrust (no pun intended) of this series of novels is not one of SF/F, but "romance". This is a romance novel and has no reason to be listed under SF/F.

May 21, 2014
  • ZenSojourner rated this: 0.5 stars out of 5.

This book is listed under Science Fiction/Fantasy, which it most definitely is not. It is a psuedo-historical bodice ripper. And I mean that LITERALLY, as the protagonist's bodice is literally ripped as soon as she trips into the 18th century where she is promptly sexually assaulted by various and sundry English and Scottish male contemporaries of varying levels of cleanliness. Furthermore, the women is so totally clueless that she can't figure out she's not in Kansas any more (OK, somewhere in post-WWII Scotland) DESPITE all these local yokels wandering about in historically accurate 17th century uniforms and clothing (not to mention speaking variations of 17th century English) until she sees the stars at night. So - multiple attempted rapes in the first few chapters of the book and a totally clueless heroine. Seriously - she doesn't attempt to cover her breasts after realizing her bodice is ripped because IT MIGHT ATTRACT MORE ATTENTION, even after she's been physically assaulted multiple times - what kind of idiot is that??? And she can't figure out that there's something wrong with the way she is dressed even after several men refer to her as a whore? In archaic English? And she still doesn't know she's in trouble? I'd give this 0 stars if I could. It's brainless, even for a bodice ripper. I am REALLY tired of coming across crap like this listed under SF/F - Having a few elements of SF/F does not an SF/F novel make. The main thrust (no pun intended) of this series of novels is not one of SF/F, but "romance". This is a romance novel and has no reason to be listed under SF/F.

May 15, 2014
  • danielestes rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

I am to this book, Outlander, as my wife is to a book like Game of Thrones. Both are fine stories addled by incessant details cascading into long-windedness, and both overwhelmingly speak to one gender over the other even though they weren't specifically written that way. Gentlemen, give Outlander a try if you wish. Just know that this one is for the ladies. Some spoilers ahead. WWII-era British Army nurse and wife Claire Randall inexplicably finds herself in 18th century Scotland after visiting a Stonehenge-like monument called Craigh na Dun and being transported through time. She is held against her will for months by a local Scottish clan before a marriage is arranged between her and the dashing, red-haired clansman Jamie MacTavish (aka James Fraser) to prevent her capture by the British army of that era. What starts out as a forced union eventually grows into one of love for Claire and Jamie. I have two points of contention for this book. First, for being displaced from her 20th century husband and thrown back two-hundred years into a world where violence and sexual assault are commonplace, Claire shows an unbelievable degree of level-headedness and strength of will. In what seems like every other chapter she's being physically attacked or nearly raped and too often her response is barely a heady indignation, like she's been cut off in traffic. Since Outlander is a romantic fantasy, I'll let this slide. Second, I had hoped the story would build toward a stronger ending, something more than being stuck in the past and wondering what to do next. Claire's time in the 18th century, once she's decided to stay, is written as a series of events rather than following along a meaningful arc. By the novel's end the narrative feels like an overlong prologue for the subsequent books. And given the overall series' length, it might well be.

May 15, 2014
  • bagleye rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Yeah, it's a bodice ripper, which is not my normal genre. However, it's much more than that, especially if you continue reading the other books in the series. I originally read it upon the recommendation of a friend who knew of my interest in history, Scotland, and the details of daily life in particular places and times. This series definitely has that, which is why the books are long and filled with details. Then I became incurably addicted to the characters. I'm reading it yet again (it's one of my favorite books, I hate to admit) because there is soon to be a TV series made of this first book.

Watch Channel 29, Showcase!
They are advertising this as a TV series starting this summer. The SHOWCASE website gives a lot of info .Can't wait!

May 12, 2014
  • LPL_PolliK rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

A fantastic read to take you away from it all. I've come back to the series several times and it's always satisfying. Even my husband likes them. Great historical content, page-turning adventure and a riveting love story (Jamie and Claire forever!)

Mar 19, 2014
  • katortiz3 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Great, great read! Pretty amazing to think of all the research that went into this one book alone. Love Jamie!

View All Comments

Age

Add Age Suitability

Jul 27, 2014
  • PBnuffsaid rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

PBnuffsaid thinks this title is suitable for 18 years and over

Feb 12, 2014
  • RLoewens rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

RLoewens thinks this title is suitable for 18 years and over

Summary

Add a Summary

May 11, 2011
  • mickaylasnana rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

English nurse Claire Beauchamp Randall and husband Frank take a second honeymoon in the Scottish Highlands in 1945. When Claire walks through a cleft stone in an ancient henge, she's somehow transported to 1743. She encounters Frank's evil ancestor, British captain Jonathan "Black Jack" Randall, and is adopted by another clan. Claire nurses young soldier James Fraser, a gallant, merry redhead, and the two begin a romance, seeing each other through many perilous, swashbuckling adventures involving Black Jack. Scenes of the Highlanders' daily life blend poignant emotions with Scottish wit and humor. Eventually Sassenach (outlander) Claire finds a chance to return to 1945, and must choose between distant memories of Frank and her happy, uncomplicated existence with Jamie.

In Scotland with her husband on a second honeymoon after World War II, Claire enters a circle of stones and is transported back to the Battle of Culloden 200 years earlier, where she must marry a Scot to save her husband

Notices

Add a Notice

Jul 27, 2014
  • PBnuffsaid rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Sexual Content: Some sexual scenes

Quotes

Add a Quote

Some hae meat that canna eat,
An some culd eat that want it,
We hae meat an we can eat,
An so may God be thank it.

Dec 17, 2012
  • LazyNeko rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

I was having trouble with the scale of things. A man killed with a musket was just as dead as one killed with a mortar. It was just that the mortar killed impersonally, destroying dozens of men, while the musket was fired by one man who could see the eyes of the one he killed. That made it murder, it seemed to me, not war. How many men to make a war?

Videos

Add a Video

May 11, 2011
  • mickaylasnana rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Outlander

Will there ever be a movie?

Find it at CLEVNET

  Loading...

Powered by BiblioCommons.
Version pocillo (pocillo) Last updated 2014/08/20 15:40