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Sense and Sensibility

Austen, Jane (Book - 1996 )
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
Sense and Sensibility
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Within the insular world of the English countryside, among struggling clerical families, husband-hunting mothers and daughters, country fools and snobs, Jane Austen found the raw material she needed to write brilliant novels widely admired for their satiric wit, subtlety and perfection of style. Sense and Sensibility is one of the best of these. It is the story of two sisters, Elinor and Marianne Dashwood, who represent sense and sensibility, respectively. When both appear to be deserted by the young men they had intended to marry, the stage is set for a delicious comedy of manners that not only showcases Austen's perception, humor and incomparable prose, but offers a splendid glimpse of upper and middle-class English society of the early 18th century.
Authors: Austen, Jane, 1775-1817
Title: Sense and sensibility
Publisher: New York : Dover Publications, 1996.
Edition: Dover ed.
Characteristics: viii, 261 p. ;,21 cm.
Notes: "Unabridged"--Cover.
Local Note: 6 15 57 118
ISBN: 0486290492
Statement of Responsibility: Jane Austen
Subject Headings: Young women Fiction. Sisters Fiction. England Fiction.
Genre/Form: Domestic fiction.
Love stories.
Topical Term: Young women
Sisters
LCCN: 95049594
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alright absolutely fantastico goodbye in Italian and Spanish. I did Not see the book, but I read the movie. How is that? I loved every splendid hour of power and I never thought that I would be able to sit still enough to know the beauty of E MMA can you hear me? are you there? magnified performance, because I am not sure if everybody in this movie is not considered a lead actor - too much is never enough - but who is the supporting all. The words, the laughs and kate you don't have to method try that cry he should have never jilted you. love you Emily Thomas

Apr 13, 2014
  • sofa2001 rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

First Jane Austen book I've read. It's long and boring, but I find the situation comical. Elinor's and Marianne's beaux seem to have other beaux, and you just have to wait and find out what happens!

May 27, 2013
  • Darryl rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

05/26/2013

Jul 16, 2012
  • Agent13 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

This is the first Austen book I've read. It came across, at first, as a soap opera written in a flowerly, pretentious manner. However, upon second thought, Austen's feminine "sense" comes through in the story of the Dashwood sisters and how they, in the final analysis, better all those in their social circle. Her writing style does take some time getting used to, though.

Jun 23, 2012
  • TKasongo rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

A true classic! It's just sad about Willoughby and Marianne :( I watched the movie afterwards and they just took out some characters; like one of the Steele sisters and Lady Middleton and her kids!

Jun 01, 2012
  • theorbys rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

My personal least favorite Jane Austen, it is still 5 stars. Jane Austen's worst (and I don't really think of it that way, it is only my taste in question) is among the best written in the English language.

Oct 01, 2011
  • Veepea rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

One of my least favourite Jane Austen books, along with Emma. I couldn't relate well to the characters, and I never like it when one of the heroines ends up with someone old enough to be her father. Why couldn't he have married their mother who was closer to his age? She needs love, too!

Jan 30, 2011
  • lisahiggs rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

Elinor (the sense) and Edward love each other while Colonel Brandon loves Marianne (the sensibility). Since all of Elinor and Edward’s interactions happen before the novel opens, you have to take Elinor’s word for it. You certainly can’t go by Edward’s actions, since he is almost never around – and when he is, he is engaged to Lucy. Whenever Colonel Brandon visits the Dashwoods, he spends all his time with Elinor, not Marianne; and whenever Elinor speaks of Colonel Brandon it is with more fondness than she displays towards anyone else, including Edward. Yet somehow Elinor and Edward marry, and so do Marianne and Colonel Brandon. Didn’t see that coming.

Jan 05, 2011
  • Noco5 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Slow to start off but gets really interesting after!

Oct 29, 2010
  • GuyN rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Like a German verb*, Austen's wit often comes, barbed, almost hidden, near the tail of the sentence. "He was giving orders...finally arranged (the toothpick cases) by his own inventive fancy...to imprint on Elinor the remembrance of a person and face, of strong, natural, sterling insignificance, though adorned in the first style of fashion." She almost seems to be politely complimenting a character until she cracks the whip and delivers the withering, almost snarky, blow. "Sterling insignificance" indeed!
Published in 1811, S&S is arguably the first modern psychological novel (OK, I hear the French cry, "La Princesse de Cleves" or "Manon Lescaut", so you can have your own opinion.)
*"Whenever the literary German dives into a sentence, that is the last you are going to see of him till he emerges on the other side of his Atlantic with his verb in his mouth." - A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, Mark Twain

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Nov 03, 2011
  • crystal_dark rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

“It isn't what we say or think that defines us, but what we do.”

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